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Are you an internet marketer and you want to stay up to date with the latest SEO – Search Engine Optimization changes to ensure your sites always stay ranking well? Or perhaps you are a business owner and would like to make sure SEO companies can’t trick you by using shiny terms and promising rankings based on information that is not accurate. If you said yes to any of the above, we are giving away a free checklist to ensure your sites are not negatively effected by Panda, Penguin, or the EMD updates from Google. We conduct webinars and provide materials that makes sure you stay up to date on the latest online marketing, and SEO techniques, SIGN UP now to automatically receive invites when we host these events, and receive our 10 Step Guide on how to Google proof your website now, and if you have been hit by a recent update this can help you recover. If you don’t know what updates we are talking about, we have given you some insight below to make sure you equallystand what is going on in the Google world.

Google Panda is a change to the Google‘s search results ranking algorithm that was first released in February 2011. The change aimed to lower the rank of “low-quality sites” or “thin sites”,[1] and return higher-quality sites near the top of the search results. CNET reported a surge in the rankings of news websites and social networking sites, and a drop in rankings for sites containing large amounts of advertising.[2] This change reportedly affected the rankings of almost 12 percent of all search results.[3] Soon after the Panda rollout, many websites, including Google’s webmaster forum, became filled with complaints of scrapers/copyright infringers getting better rankings than sites with original content. At one point, Google publicly asked for data points[4] to help detect scrapers better. Google’s Panda has received several updates since the original rollout in February 2011, and the effect went global in April 2011. To help affected publishers, Google published an advisory on its blog,[5] thus giving some direction for self-evaluation of a website’s quality. Google has provided a list of 23 bullet points on its blog answering the question of “What counts as a high-quality site?” that is supposed to help webmasters “step into Google’s mindset”.[6]

Google Penguin is a code name[1] for a Google algorithm update that was first announced on April 24, 2012. The update is aimed at decreasing search engine rankings of websites that violate Google’s Webmaster Guidelines [2] by using black-hat SEO techniques, such as keyword stuffing,[3] cloaking,[4] participating in link schemes,[5] deliberate creation of duplicate content,[6] and others.

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