Bing Brings The Fireworks To Its July 4th Homepage

Bing July 4th homepage

To celebrate the July 4th holiday today, Bing’s homepage features an image by Steve Kelly of a fireworks display over the Hudson River.

The hidden links within the page offers shortcuts to a selection of American-themed searches, including:

  • “Fourth of July”
  • “Hoboken, New Jersey” (The first city to host the first officially recorded baseball game.)
  • “Joey Chestnut Eats 69 Hot Dogs 2013 Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest”
  • “Red white and blue desserts”

Users can share the homepage image on their Facebook and Twitter profiles from the share button in the top right corner of the image, or click the download icon in the bottom right corner to use it as their wallpaper.

The image’s “Info” button links to a brief history of our July 4th holiday:

Founding father John Adams believed that July 2 would be celebrated as a “day of deliverance…with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations.”

Why did Adams expect Americans to celebrate July 2 and not July 4? Because July 2, 1776, was the day the Second Continental Congress officially rejected British rule and the 13 colonies joined together to form the United States.

Bing goes on to clarify that the Declaration of Independence was actually approved on July 4th, making today the day we celebrate our country’s birth as a sovereign nation.

Bing Brings The Fireworks To Its July 4th Homepage

Bing July 4th homepage

To celebrate the July 4th holiday today, Bing’s homepage features an image by Steve Kelly of a fireworks display over the Hudson River.

The hidden links within the page offers shortcuts to a selection of American-themed searches, including:

  • “Fourth of July”
  • “Hoboken, New Jersey” (The first city to host the first officially recorded baseball game.)
  • “Joey Chestnut Eats 69 Hot Dogs 2013 Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest”
  • “Red white and blue desserts”

Users can share the homepage image on their Facebook and Twitter profiles from the share button in the top right corner of the image, or click the download icon in the bottom right corner to use it as their wallpaper.

The image’s “Info” button links to a brief history of our July 4th holiday:

Founding father John Adams believed that July 2 would be celebrated as a “day of deliverance…with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations.”

Why did Adams expect Americans to celebrate July 2 and not July 4? Because July 2, 1776, was the day the Second Continental Congress officially rejected British rule and the 13 colonies joined together to form the United States.

Bing goes on to clarify that the Declaration of Independence was actually approved on July 4th, making today the day we celebrate our country’s birth as a sovereign nation.